Well We\’re Movin\ On Up

Have you ever wondered what would happen if a ‘Cinemax After Dark’ special, a James Bond movie, the Guy On Hollywood Boulevard Whose Whole Body Is Covered In Gold Paint, and the gnawing emptiness of late-stage capitalism screwed in the backseat of a very high-end car and then gave birth to a three-minute Red Band trailer for, um, a house? Well, WONDER NO MORE, for this has happened {NSFW}:

Yes, the above is a “trailer” for Opus, a $100 million “state of the art dream home” currently for sale in Los Angeles. We “wanted to do something really high art,” a spokesperson for the home told LAist in reference to the short film. The house has Roberto Cavalli flooring, a 15-seat curved screen theater with JBL Synthesis Audio, two massive bars—one of which has a “Winestation” that preserves and dispenses glasses with the exact amount and temperature desired—a gourmet show kitchen with an iPad-controlled coffee machine, Longhi doors in suede and embossed leather, and a separate catering/event kitchen.

It make sense; Who in their right mind would even consider buying a house without it’s own introductory film? 1

Well We're Movin' On Up

Show 1 footnote

  1. This is just to over the top; expect to see Craig’s List knockoff films soon. Finally! We’ll have something with which to replace that damned Hitler-clip meme.

Inequality

(…)Oxfam International is raising such questions at the World Economic Forum at Davos, where the global elite gather to talk of big ideas and big money. Oxfam executive director, Winnie Byanyima, is arguing that this increasing concentration of wealth since the recession is “bad for growth and bad for governance”. What’s more, inequality is bad not just for the poor, but for the rich too. That’s why we have the likes of the IMF’s Christine Lagarde kicking off with warnings about rising inequality. Visceral inequality from foodbanks to empty luxury flats is still seen as somehow being in the eye of the beholder by the right – a narrative in which poverty is seen as an innate moral failure of the poor themselves has taken hold. This in turn sustains the idea that rich people deserve their incredible riches. Most wealth, though, is not earned: huge assets, often inherited, simply get bigger not because the individuals who own them are super talented, but because structures are in place to ensure this happens…

The rich, via lobbyists and Byzantine tax arrangements, actively work to stop redistribution. Inequality is not inevitable, it’s engineered. Many mainstream economists do not question the degree of this engineering, even when it is highly dubious. This level of acceptance among economists of inequality as merely an unfortunate byproduct of growth, alongside their failure to predict the crash, has worryingly not affected their cult status among blinkered admirers…

When we talk of neoliberalism, we are talking about something that has fuelled inequality and enabled the 1%. All it means is a stage of capitalism in which the financial markets were deregulated, public services privatised, welfare systems run down, laws to protect working people dismantled, and unions cast as the enemy.

Inequality

Greater Worker Insecurity

The idea is to divide society into two groups. One group is sometimes called the “plutonomy” (a term used by Citibank when they were advising their investors on where to invest their funds), the top sector of wealth, globally but concentrated mostly in places like the United States. The other group, the rest of the population, is a “precariat,” living a precarious existence.

This idea is sometimes made quite overt. So when Alan Greenspan was testifying before Congress in 1997 on the marvels of the economy he was running, he said straight out that one of the bases for its economic success was imposing what he called “greater worker insecurity.” If workers are more insecure, that’s very “healthy” for the society, because if workers are insecure they won’t ask for wages, they won’t go on strike, they won’t call for benefits; they’ll serve the masters gladly and passively. And that’s optimal for corporations’ economic health.

Noam Chomsky

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